Five less obvious must-follow Instagram feeds

An online search (as well as Insta’s cheeky algorithms) offers up no end of recommendations for the Instagram feeds those in the marketing industry need to be following.

We take a step away from the obvious, and list the top five Grams we follow that offer up a different (and sometimes quirky) take on brand, marketing and consumer activity.

1. OTHER PEOPLE'S SHOPPING LISTS

@Otherpeoplesshoppinglists is just one in a collection of Instagram feeds that documents grocery shopping lists recovered from supermarket trolleys. If we are what we eat, can abandoned shopping lists provide a rich insight into consumers’ lives? There’s definitely something voyeuristically satisfying in reading what’s on these lists and in conjuring portraits of their owners.

2. KEVS SNACK REVIEWS

If you want to hear about new product launches as soon as they’ve hit the supermarket shelves, then @Kevssnackreviews is a must-follow. Kev showcases new, unusual and unique snacks on his feed, and dishes up impassioned product reviews over on his blog (http://kevssnackreviews.blogspot.com) .

3. REBEL BOOK CLUB

To counter the act of Tsundoku (the constant act of buying books, but never reading them), @Rebelbookclub was set up to accelerate reading habits with a monthly meet-up over cocktails. With a reading list that's strictly non-fiction, its feed publicises upcoming titles, which often have a marketing and consumer behaviour focus.

4. DESERT ISLAND CRISPS

Fandom is all over the Gram, from #christianlouboutin to err, #crisps.
@Desertislandcrisps critiques the wonderful world of crisps. With castaways waxing lyrical about their top three crisp brands, this feed is a must for anyone who prefers their snacks savoury rather than sweet. In addition, Desert Island Crisps The Podcast offers career inspiration by chatting to up and coming millennials about what it's like to be starting out in their industries...while eating their favourite crisps.

5. HAIKU BOMBS

@Haiku_bombs writes Haiku (the traditional form of Japanese poetry) about random things found in the street. The poems are then stuck to those items before being photographed for Instagram. The Haiku offer up a playful take on consumerism and our throwaway culture.